Home Knowledge Peanut Oil Substitute – The 8 Best Options

Peanut Oil Substitute – The 8 Best Options

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Peanut oil substitutesPeanut oil is a versatile cooking ingredient that’s extracted from peanuts and can be used for sautéing, frying and baking. The flavor of peanut oil varies from neutral through to mildly nutty. A high smoke point makes it ideal for stir-frying as it can withstand high temperatures without burning or tainting the flavors.

With an estimated 1.2 million children and teens having a peanut allergy¹ it’s possible that you may need to cook for a member of the household who can’t eat peanut oil. In some cases, peanut oil may not be available in your local store. Whatever the reasons, you’re going to need a peanut oil substitute so that you can finish that recipe.

Alternatives to peanut oil – 8 options

The best alternative to peanut oil for all-round cooking is canola or sunflower oil. They both have a high smoke point, are relatively low priced and provide a neutral flavor that’s suited to most baking applications.

Need more options? Here is a list of eight commonly found cooking oils that are excellent alternatives to peanut oil.

1. Corn oil

Corn oil next to cornCorn oil is extracted from the germ of maize and offers a low-cost option with a smoke point that is similar to peanut oil. Polyunsaturated fat levels are relatively high in this oil which is linked to some health issues so canola or sunflower would be a better option if they’re available.

Best used for: Sautéing, deep frying, stir frying and baking.

2. Almond Oil

Almond oil next to almondsIf you have a nut allergy then keep working your way down the list.

Although almond oil tends to be a higher priced product, it offers excellent health benefits and is a premium product. Choose a refined oil if you’re looking to cook at high temperatures; for dressings, vinaigrettes and drizzles opt for a cold pressed almond oil.

Almond oil can have a distinct nutty flavor which can be seen as a positive or negative, depending on personal taste preferences.

Best used for: Sautéing, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes and drizzles.

3. Soy bean oil

Soybean oil and a pile of soybeansSoybean oil is extracted from the soybean and is a low-cost ingredient that has a high smoke point. It has a neutral flavor making it suitable for most cooking applications.

Best used for: Sautéing, deep frying, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes and drizzles.

4. Canola Oil

Canola oil in a bottleCanola oil is a popular cooking oil that derives from the rapeseed and is low in saturated fat. Canola is another oil that has a neutral flavor and high smoke point. This makes it an ideal candidate for most recipes that call for peanut oil.

Related topic: Have you ever wondered what the difference is between canola and olive oil? Good news: we’ve created a comparison of the two oils so that you know which is best for certain jobs in the kitchen. Read more here>

Best used for: Grilling, sautéing, deep frying, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes, drizzles, seasoning pans.

5. Grape Seed Oil

Grapeseed oil in a jar with grapesGrape seed oil is a premium cooking oil that comes with a relatively high price tag. It does a brilliant job of sautéing and frying, and its neutral flavor means it is ideal for baking.

Best used for: Sautéing, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes and drizzles

6. Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil and sunflowersSunflower oil is pressed from the seeds of sunflowers and is an excellent alternative to peanut oil. It is a popular choice of oil thanks to its long shelf life and high levels of Vitamin E.

Most sunflower oil is refined so it will have very little flavor – good for baking. Its smoke point makes it suitable for any high temperature cooking also.

Best used for: Grilling, sautéing, deep frying, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes, drizzles.

7. Safflower Oil

Safflower oilSafflower oil is a lesser known oil on this list but that doesn’t make it any less useful as a backup option for peanut oil. It is a relative of the sunflower and doesn’t overpower dishes with strong a flavor. As with all the oils on this list, safflower oil has a high smoke point.

Best used for: Grilling, sautéing, deep frying, stir frying, searing, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes, drizzles.

8. Macadamia Oil

Macadamia oil next to macadamia nutsMacadamia oil is another suitable peanut oil substitute and is growing in popularity so finding this product in stores shouldn’t be a challenge. If you’re avoiding peanut oil due to allergies then this is another oil to avoid.

Best used for: Grilling, sautéing, deep frying, stir frying, baking, dressings, vinaigrettes, drizzles.

Related reading:
Find out what the best avocado oil substitute is for your next recipe.
What does a peanut butter fruit taste like?
What are the top pine nut substitutes?

Final words

Whether you’re allergic to peanuts, don’t like the taste or don’t have a bottle available, finding a substitute for peanut oil is quite simple. A visit to the oil section of your local supermarket will provide a range of options that are just as functional as the original, without the peanuts.

Personally, I’d choose canola or sunflower oil as they tick all the boxes. Grape seed oil is an excellent oi but it tends to come with a higher price tag and it’s less readily available in stores.

Reference: https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/acaai/76459